This blog post is the companion post to the video: How to Tell if a Company is a Pyramid or a Legitimate MLM.

You may have been recruited for a network marketing opportunity or you are a recruiter. Inevitably, this question will come up, is the company a pyramid scheme or a legitimate business opportunity?

Although this is a complex legal area, let me share a simple metaphor that draws a clear line in the sand.

The metaphor is about a gentlemen, will call him Party #1, and he sells a case of canned tuna fish to Party #2 for $10. And, Party #2 sells it to Party #3 for $20, and Party #3 sells the case of canned tuna fish until it gets to Party #10, who buys the case of canned tuna for $500. And, Party #10 opens up the case of tuna fish and it’s rancid. It’s inedible.

He goes back to Party #9 and complains, “I bought this case of tuna for $500 and it’s rancid.” Party #9 tells him to take it to Party #8, and Party #8 tells him to take it to Party #7, and so on until Party #10 goes all the way back to Party #1 and says, “You’re the one who started all of this! I have a problem!”

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Some clear criteria for legitimate direct selling/network marketing companies have long been recognized.

In determining whether a program is a legitimate direct selling/network marketing opportunity, the would-be participant should consider several important points:

  1. Goods or Service. Legitimate companies offer high-quality goods or services and guarantee consumer satisfaction. Goods and services must have a “real” demand in the marketplace, or an anticipated “real” demand if the good or service is just being introduced. Goods and services must have their own intrinsic value, such that distributors who purchase them would do so even if they were not involved in a network marketing business opportunity.

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